Robot Sweatshop – Episode 27: The Dan Show

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A brand new episode of Robot Sweatshop featuring just Dan! This is Robot Sweatshop as you’ve never heard it: Listen as Dan discusses Paul McCartney live at Citi Field, a new form of pan-handling he saw on the NYC subway, talks Batman and Robin and Wednesday Comics, RiffTrax Live, AND takes some phone calls. A must listen — AGAIN!

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2 thoughts on “Robot Sweatshop – Episode 27: The Dan Show

  1. you only like fun music so you write off John Lennons solo stuff? no Working Class Hero? no How Do You Sleep? no Cold Turkey? just fun? that’s it?

    Lx

  2. Hi Louis,

    First, thanks for listening.

    Ah, my big Beatles talk. I knew that would get a reaction! I don’t write off John solo AT ALL. I own everything he ever put out post-Beatles, including tons of bootlegs. I do think that, yes, his solo stuff takes itself way too seriously and his pretty narcissistic. Paul helped balance that out within the Beatles, just like John helped balance out Paul’s sometime overboard lightheartedness.

    That being said, Paul’s solo work is way more imaginative musically than John’s. Ram and Band on the Run, in particular, are so diverse, with complex arrangements and harmonies, that they blow me away each listen. John made a lot of straight-up rock that really wasn’t that innovative.

    “Cold Turkey’s” a good song, sure. “How Do You Sleep” has a good groove, but again, I think Paul’s songs to John — “Too Many People” and “Let Me Roll It” — are better both lyrically and musically. I prefer Paul’s style of writing in those songs. Whereas John would zing Paul with a boring, straightforward line like “The only thing you done was yesterday,” Paul wrote, “Too many people preaching practices, don’t let ’em tell you what you wanna be.” And Paul’s right — the whole Beatles thing was about saying that being yourself and respecting others (i.e., a form of peace, let’s say), yet John and Yoko began telling everyone what to do and what to think. Yet Paul said it in a way that left it open to interpretation, like a great writer would. Not to mention, “Too Many People” is an AWESOME song with a great energy, killer vocals and virtuoso playing. That’s where the fun comes in.

    Anyways, of course, it’s not just about being fun. I was half-kidding when I said that. But Paul is responsible for some truly amazing solo albums whereas I think even John’s best don’t compare. Just my opinion.

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