Comics Alternative Interviews: Mark Voger

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Time Codes:

  • 00:00:24 – Introduction
  • 00:02:28 – Setup of interview
  • 00:03:47 – Interview with Mark Voger
  • 01:05:43 – Wrap up
  • 01:07:15 – Contact us

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“We didn’t need LSD. We had Quisp and Quake.”

On this interview episode, Derek talks with Mark Voger about his latest work, Groovy: When Flower Power Bloomed in Pop Culture. The book comes out this week from TwoMorrows Publishing, and during their conversation Mark discusses the roots of groovy culture that reach back to early twentieth-century modernism and jazz, and are even apparent in discoveries during nineteenth century. But most of the interview is spent talking about the flowering, so to speak, of this cultural trend from the mid-1960s into the early 1970s. Obviously Derek asks Mark about the comics of the time — Mike Sekowsky’s new Wonder Woman, Steve Ditko’s Hawk and Dove, Jim Steranko’s Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D., Archie Comics’ Josie, and the underground comix of R. Crumb, Trina Robbins, Jay Lynch, Kim Deitch, and Denis Kitchen — but they also spend a lot of time discussing “groovy culture” in music, television, film, fashion, and art. Mark also briefly covers his previous book, Monster Mash: The Creepy, Kooky Monster Craze In America 1957-1972, and the creative transition he made from the ghoulish to the psychedelic. These were the concurrent popular movements that largely defined his young life.

Be sure to visit Mark Voger’s website to learn more about his groovy work!

Comics Alternative Interviews: Michael Eury

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Time Codes:

  • 00:00:25 – Introduction
  • 00:02:19 – Setup of interview
  • 00:04:09 – Interview with Michael Eury
  • 01:27:46 – Wrap up
  • 01:28:38 – Contact us

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“Wonderful, warm blanket of camp”

On this interview episode Derek talks with the Eisner Award-nominated editor-in-chief of Back Issue magazine Michael Eury. His new book Hero-a-Go-Go: Campy Comic Books, Crimefighters and Culture of the Swinging Sixties comes out from TwoMorrows Publishing next week, and the two discuss this project’s genesis and the significance of the camp cultural phenomenon. This text stands out because Eury doesn’t limit himself to just comics, but instead he looks at camp from a wider vista, revealing its convergence among television, film, toys, cartoons, music, and everyday consumable products. In Hero-a-Go-Go, readers will find in-depth discussions of such subjects as Metamorpho, The Inferior Five, Jerry Lewis comics, MonkeemaniaNot Brand Echh, Hanna-Barbera cartoonsHerbie the Fat Fury, Captain Action, the TV Green Hornet, M.F. Enterprise’s Captain Marvel, The Cowsills, JFK and LBJ in comics, the ill-fated Harvey Thrillers, and, of course, the Batman television series. As Michael reveals over the course of this interview, Hero-a-Go-Go is intended for diverse audiences, written as both an informed introduction and a chronicle for remembrance.