Comic News Insider Episode 864 – SDCC Press Barrage!

Comic News Insider: Episode 864 is now available for free download! Click on the link or get it through iTunes! Sponsored by Dynamic Forces.

Reviews: Batman Vol 3 #50, Captain America Vol 9 #1, Catwoman Vol 5 #1, Elvira Mistress Of The Dark Vol 2 #1, Ant Man and The Wasp 

Prepping for San Diego Comic Con leaves Jimmy curled up in a ball of stress so he recruits pals to help out! Thanks to Ashley, Rich and Jon for those audio reviews. And to newswoman Emily for providing the news! Which includes: DC Comics announced Anatomy of a Metahuman with stunning art from Ming Doyle, Neil Gaiman announces Neverwhere sequel, R.L. Stine has signed an original graphic novel deal with Boom! Studios and more! Leave your iTunes comments! 5 stars and nothing but love! Also, get a hold of us!

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Comic News Insider Episode 860 – More Heroes Con w/ Bridgit Connell/Tom Akel!

Comic News Insider: Episode 860 is now available for free download! Click on the link or get it through iTunes! Sponsored by Dynamic Forces.

Reviews: Tank Girl All Stars #1, 2000AD Sci-Fi Special, Preacher s3 premiere, Westworld s2 finale, Incredibles 2, Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom

Jimmy is still recovering from Heroes Con and brings you more interviews! You’ll hear him talk with pal Bridgit Connell about her new book with Titan Comics called Brother Nash. Always super fun to catch up with Bridgit! And he has a great chat with Tom Akel (Head of Content at Line WebToon) about what comics they are producing, their mission statement, how to get in the webcomics game and more. Thanks to Rachael, Ashley, Karlin and Erica for their audio reviews! News includes: Sam Kieth is writing/illustrating a The Maxx/Batman mini-series, the recent rumors that the Star Wars spin-offs are cancelled may not be true, DC Comics is bringing back their Giant comics exclusively to Wal-Mart and more! Leave your iTunes comments! 5 stars and nothing but love! Also, get a hold of us!

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Comics Alternative for Young Readers: A Discussion of the Nominees for the 2018 Eisner Awards for the Early Readers, Kids, and Teens Categories

Time Codes:

  • 00:00:31 – Introduction
  • 00:03:19 – Setup of the discussion
  • 00:05:04 – Nominees in the Best Publication for Early Readers category 
  • 00:51:47 – Nominees in the Best Publication for Kids category
  • 01:31:45 – Nominees in the Best Publication for Teens category
  • 02:20:32 – Wrap up
  • 02:26:03 – Contact us

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Putting on the Evening Gown and Tuxedo

On this episode of the Comics Alternative Young Readers Show, Gwen and Paul detail the three categories of the Eisner Awards that focus on children and teens:

Best Publication for Early Readers (up to age 8)

Best Publication for Kids (ages 9–12)

Best Publication for Teens (ages 13-17)

  • The Dam Keeperby Robert Kondo and Dice Tsutsumi (First Second/Tonko House)
  • Jane, by Aline Brosh McKenna and Ramón K. Pérez (Archaia)
  • Louis Undercover, by Fanny Britt and Isabelle Arsenault, translated by Christelle Morelli and Susan Ouriou (Groundwood Books/House of Anansi)
  • Monstressby Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda (Image)
  • Spinningby Tillie Walden (First Second)

In addition to reviewing each nominated text, the duo refers listeners to The Comics Alternative archives for the shows that reference these nominees: Good Night, Planet by Liniers; Nightlights by Lorena Alvarez; The Dam Keeper by Robert Kondo and Dice Tsutsumi; and Monstress by Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda.

Paul and Gwen use this episode to launch a general discussion of age designations and categorization of children’s and YA comics, and they reference the art of Bolivian painter and lithographer Graciela Rodo Boulanger, whose depiction of children resembles that found in Campbell Whyte’s Home Time. So, won’t you pour yourself a chilly beverage, kick back, and give a listen to the two PhDs — more on Paul’s recent doctoral graduation from University of California-Berkeley will appear in the June podcast — for a rundown of this year’s Eisner nominees.

Episode 264: Our Favorite Comics of 2017

Time Codes:

  • 00:00:27 – Introduction
  • 00:03:14 – Contexts and caveats
  • 00:11:32 – Our favorite comics of 2017
  • 02:09:06 – Wrapping up our favorites, and honorable mentions
  • 02:13:52 – Contact us

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And the Winner Is…

Paul and Derek are back with The Comics Alternative‘s annual “Favorites” episode. This is where the Two Guys share what they consider to be the best comics of the past year. Usually this year-end show is released as the very last regular review episode of each year, but this time around the guys had to postpone the recording due to family issues. But we’re not far from the end of 2017, and Paul and Derek wanted to get the show out in as timely a manner as possible. So here you have it, the Two Guys’ 10 favorite titles of 2017:

Paul’s Top 10 of 2017

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Derek’s Top 10 of 2017

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The Honorable Mentions…These Titles Almost, but Just Didn’t Quite, Make It onto Each Guy’s List

For Paul

For Derek

Comic News Insider Episode 825 – The Best of 2017!

Comic News Insider: Episode 825 is now available for free download! Click on the link or get it through iTunes! Sponsored by Dynamic Forces.

Heidi MacDonald (The Beat) returns to join Jimmy in the annual “Best of 2017” podcast! While there were many amazing comic books, TV shows, films and more…these are the best picks that THEY happen to read/watch. They probably missed some of your favorites but hope you check out what they really enjoyed in 2017. I mean, just check out that picture above. They covered A LOT! They’re definitely more loquacious than laconic so buckle up for a long ride! So many great creators in comics this year and quite a few got multiple kudos throughout the podcast. Thanks to Penelope Bagieu, Emil Ferris, Tillie Walden, Tom King, Greg Pak, Sina Grace and many others for bringing us such amazing work last year. Looking forward to all of your future projects! Drop us a line and let us know what some of your favorites were so we can check them out. Leave your iTunes comments! 5 stars and nothing but love! Also, get a hold of us!

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Comics Alternative, Episode 252: Reviews of Spinning, Love and Rockets, Vol. 4 #3, and Slots #1

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Time Codes:

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On the Ice, in the Casino

On this week’s episode of The Comics Alternative, Paul joins Derek in discussing three exciting new titles. They begin with Spinning, Tillie Walden’s new book and her initial release for First Second. What makes this work stand out from her previous comics, such as The End of Summer and I Love This Part, is that it is an outright memoir. This is a coming-of-age narrative, and Walden uses her history of competitive ice skating as a scaffolding for her life story. There’s a lot in this memoir about her chosen sport, but Spinning is much more than a book about skating. In it, we see Walden’s key relationships, her search for a mother figure, and her coming out to family and friends.

Next, the guys check out the latest issue of Love and Rockets (Fantagraphics). In this issue, the third in the magazine-sized fourth volume, both Jaime and Gilbert continue the storylines they had begun in the earlier New Stories annuals. Gilbert gives us the further adventures of Fritz, her daughters, and the Fritz wannabes, while Jaime returns to his Princess Anima story and the Hoppers punk reunion. What most strikes both Derek and Paul, however, are the two short pieces early in the issue where Jaime visits the young Maggie and Hopey in 1979. The guys hope there is more on the teenage locas in future issues.

Finally, the Two Guys wrap up by discussing the first issue of a new series from Image Comics, Dan Panosian’s Slots. This is the story of Stanley Dance, a former boxer and antihero who does what he can to get by. It takes place in Las Vegas, and both Paul and Derek are struck by how Panosian’s art, as well as his storytelling style, captures the loose and freewheeling feel of the gambling capital. They’re impressed by this first issue and plan to continue with this series.

Comics Alternative, Webcomics: Reviews of the 2017 Eisner Award Nominees

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Time Codes:

  • 00:00:27 – Introduction
  • 00:02:55 – Webcomics news: The Library of Congress’ Web Comics Web Archive
  • 00:11:24 – Trying to make sense of the Eisner Awards’ “Best Web Comic” and “Best Digital Comic” categories
  • 00:30:37 – The Middle Age
  • 00:44:30 – On Beauty
  • 00:56:54 – Helm
  • 01:08:27 – On a Sunbeam
  • 01:32:41 – Wrap up
  • 01:34:14 – Contact us

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Definitionally Challenged

For the June webcomics episode, Sean and Derek take a close look at the webcomics nominees for the 2017 Eisner Awards. Before they do that, though, they have to determine exactly which titles are actually webcomics and which are not. If this sounds strange, that’s because this year the people behind the Eisner Awards have separated “Best Digital Comics” and “Best Webcomic” into two completely different categories — which is a good thing — but in doing so they have ill-defined the criteria to where there are digital comics mixed in the “Best Webcomic” category and webcomics in the “Best Digital Comic” category. In other words, there doesn’t seem to be any clear distinctions between the two…which was the problem in previous years when webcomics and digital comics were unfortunately clumped into the same category. Sean and Derek discuss in detail the problems underlying this year’s categorization, and they offer advice for next year’s judges and hope that in the future there will be a much more precise understanding of what a webcomic actually is.

After that, they begin discussing the real webcomics that are scattered between the “Best Webcomic” and “Best Digital Comic” categories. There are five in all, and in this episode they discuss Steve Conley’s The Middle Age and Christina Tran’s On Beauty (both nominated for “Best Webcomic”), as well as Jahanzeb Hasan and Mauricio Caballero’s Helm and Tillie Walden’s On a Sunbeam (inexplicably nominated under “Best Digital Comic”). Anne Szabla’s Bird Boy was also nominated as a webcomic, but since the guys discussed that title on a previous webcomics episode, they spend their time talking about the other nominees. And as the guys reveal, there is a reason why these four titles are nominated for an Eisner Award this year. They’re all well-written, keenly drawn, and ambitious in what each endeavors to accomplish. Both Sean and Derek wish this year’s webcomics creators, despite the appropriateness of the categories for which they’re nominated, the best of luck when the announcements are made at next month’s SDCC!

Comics Alternative, Episode 188: A Publisher Spotlight on Avery Hill Publishing

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Musical Discoveries

AveryHill-banner

Gwen and Derek are back with another publisher spotlight episode, this one on the UK press, Avery Hill Publishing. They begin their spotlight with a short interview with the people behind Avery Hill: Ricky Miller, Dave White, and Katriona Chapman. Derek talks with them about the origins of the press, the kind of creators that have come to define Avery Hill, their distribution and publicity outside of the UK, and their plans for fall releases and beyond.

After that conversation, Gwen and Derek get into the nitty gritty of the publisher’s current offerings. They start by looking at the most recent issues of two ongoing series from Avery Hill, Reads #4 and Metroland #3. The former is an anthology periodical currently in its second volume, and the two discuss its various serialized storylines. Gwen is particularly fond of Owen D. Pomery’s “The Megatherium Club,” but they also discuss Reads‘ other historically based stories — Ricky Avery-HillMiller and Tim Bird’s “Hitchcock and Film” as well as Bird and Luke James Halsall’s “The Bullpen” (inspired by Marvel Comics in the early 1960s) — and the colorful, offbeat comics of EdieOP. The most recent issue of Metroland continues the drama behind Ricky Miller and Julia Scheele’s fictional 1980s band, Electric Dreams, and while discussing this evolving narrative, Derek and Gwen even wax nostalgic over their own musical histories growing up during that time.

Next, they discuss three new books released this spring. A City Inside is yet another work from Tillie Walden — she’s become a singular force at Avery Hill — and this one is a measured, meditative look at self-identity with an almost poetic tone. Rachael Smith’s Artificial Flowers does to the London art scene what Miller and Scheele’s Metroland does with the city post-punk. Both the artist’s unassuming premise and her clean, iconic art style easily draw Gwen and Derek into this fun story. And then finally, the cohosts wrap up with the latest book in Matthew Swan’s Parsley Girl series. Neither Derek nor Gwen had been familiar with Swan’s work previously, but Parsley Girl: Carrots proves to be a good introduction into his weird and almost psychedelic narrative world.

Overall, both Gwen and Derek find a lot of excitement behind this young press. Avery Hill may be just now getting a foothold in the US market — thanks to its recent distribution agreement with Retrofit/Big Planet — but as this episode demonstrates, it’s definitely a publisher worth watching.

Parsley Girl-interior

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Comics Alternative Interviews: Tillie Walden

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“Great party, isn’t it?”

WaldenPicOn this episode of The Comics Alternative Interviews, Derek has a great time talking with Tillie Walden, the author of a brand new book from Avery Hill Publishing, The End of Summer. This is her debut graphic novel, and, in fact, her conversation with Derek is the very first time she’s been on a podcast. (Yet another Comics Alternative exclusive!) On the show, Tillie talks about the origins of her story, her process of creation, and the unlikely events that led to her first publication. The End of Summer is a narrative of purpose in isolation, EndOfSummeran attempt to find meaning in a life defined by diminishing options. Walden’s haunting art reveals the inner turmoil of her protagonist/narrator, Lars, as he negotiates the tangles within his family over the course of one long winter. Plus, she includes in her story a giant cat by the name of Nemo. Derek talks with Tillie about the balancing act of being a full-time student — she’s just wrapped up her first year at the Center for Cartoon Studies — and creating a long-form comic. They also discuss her love of architectural illustration (evident throughout the book), the dream-like quality of her storytelling, and the many instances of Kubrick’s The Shining that kept popping into Derek’s head as he was reading the book. All in all, it is an illuminating conversation that will have you wanting to check out this promising young writer.

Here is some sample art from The End of Summer:

EndofSummer2

And be sure to check out Tillie Walden’s website.

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