Comics Alternative, Webcomics: Reviews of The Red Hook, Kill 6 Billion Demons, and Rice Boy

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Reluctant Heroes

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Time Codes:

  • 00:00:27 – Introduction
  • 00:07:03 – Brief comments on the 2016 Ignatz Award nominees for Outstanding Online Comic
  • 00:18:07 – The Red Hook
  • 00:57:28 – Kill 6 Billion Demons
  • 01:21:11 – Interview with Jim McClain and Paul Schultz
  • 01:41:15 – Rice Boy
  • 02:13:55 – Wrap up
  • 02:15:30 – Contact us

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On this extra-long episode of The Comics Alternative Webcomics, Sean and Derek cover a lot of territory on the webcomics front. They begin with a few brief comments on this year’s Ignatz Award nominees for Outstanding Online Comic. They also contrast the way that the Ignatz judges classify webcomics with what the Eisner Awards has been doing lately, combining webcomics and digital comics.

After that, the guys jump into the core of this month’s episode with a look at Dean Haspiel’s The Red Hook. They discuss, among other things, the fact that superhero comics are relatively rare in webcomics and that this title is reminiscent of what Haspiel did with The Fox, for Archie Comics, and with his own comics centered on Billy Dogma and Jane Legit. Sean and Derek also spend a bit of time talking about Webtoons, the platform where you’ll find The Red Hook.

Next, they review Kill 6 Billion Demons. Both of the guys are impressed by Tom Parkinson-Morgan’s art and the intricacies involved in his world-building, but they are somewhat critical of the webcomic’s design and usability. It’s not easy to navigate that site, which is surprising, given the fact that Kill 6 Billion Demons has been around since 2013.

Before they turn to the final webcomic of the month, Derek and Sean introduce what they hope will be a new feature of the monthly series. Beginning with this episode, they will talk briefly with Jim McClain and Paul Schultz about a new webcomics they’re creating, Poe and the Mysteriads. Every month they hope to check in with the creators about the step-by-step process they’re going through in developing the title, from story concept to art choices to the design of the website.

Finally, Sean and Derek look at Evan Dahm’s already completed webcomic, Rice Boy. This is the second time Dahm’s work has been a focus of the webcomics series, the first occasion being a discussion of Vattu back in January 2015. This is a much earlier webcomic, and the guys discuss the evolution of Dahm’s art and storytelling style as the story develops. It’s an intriguing fantastical quest narrative, and if you’re not already familiar with Dahm, then this would be a great way to get to know his work.

Sample art from Poe and the Mysteriads

Sample art from Poe and the Mysteriads

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Wayne’s Comics Podcast #206: Evan Dahm

Wayne Hall, Wayne’s Comics, kickstarter, Evan Dham, Vattu, the Name & the Mark, the Sword & the Sacrament, Rice Boy, Heroes Con,

I love variety in my comics reading, and one of my favorite webcomics/trade paperbacks is the Vattu series from creator Evan Dahm, who I talk with during this 206th episode of my Wayne’s Comics Podcast. The first volume, called Vattu: the Name & the Mark, got me hooked when I met Evan at this year’s Heroes Con in North Carolina. He’s now in the middle of a current Kickstarter.com project for his second book, Vattu: the Sword & the Sacrament. They’re described as “the first two books of a graphic novel series about conquest and identity, set in a world of strange creatures.” To participate, be sure to go to this link before the project concludes on Thursday, December 17, at 9:10 a.m. EST.

Evan and I talk about several of the series’ engaging layers of story, what attracted me to it and keeps me coming back for more, the various characters in the books, and how you can also access Vattu! Go to rice-boy.com/vattu to enjoy this title as a webcomic series, which is how I got to read the second trade (and even part of the third)! It’s the winner of the 2014 Ignatz Award for Best Online Comic and the 2013 Stumptown Comic Arts Award for best webcomic. You can follow along via TumblrFacebook, or RSS.. If you’re looking for something new, creative and different, don’t miss this excellent book in graphic novel or webcomic format – after you hear my fun conversation with Evan, of course!