Deconstructing Comics #432: A Cat Named John Martz

Cat Named TimAt the International Comics Festival in November, Tim picked up A Cat Named Tim and Other Stories by John Martz. It’s a whimsical book aimed at kids that plays with several devices that only work in comics. It’s also another example of the convergence of comics and children’s picture books that we noted on this podcast years back with Mo Willems.

This week Tim talks with John about this convergence, as well as the challenges of making material aimed at kids, inspiration from Jacques Tati and Charles Addams, storyboarding, Destination X, and, oh yeah, Popeye loops!

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Deconstructing Comics #419: “Seconds” and “Talbot Toluca”

Seconds and Talbot TolucaYou know that feeling when you love an artist’s work, but then you get their next one, and feel like… ehh, the magic’s gone? Tim was afraid that would be his reaction to Bryan Lee O’Malley’s Seconds but, as he discusses with Cassey this week, his fears were completely misplaced!

Also this week, a discussion with Kenneth Kit Lamug. His picture book A Box Story won a Moonbeam Children’s Book Award, Pinnacle Book Achievement Award, a Children’s Literary Classics Seal of Approval, and was a National Indie Excellence Book Award finalist, all in 2012. Now trying his hand at comics, he recently funded a Kickstarter project for The Tall Tales of Talbot Toluca: Quest for the Ore Crystals. Tim talks with him about the Kickstarter, moving from illustration to comics, not quitting his day job, and more.

Super Hero Speak – #39: Tony DiGerolamo

This week John and Dave sit down with special guest Tony DiGerolamo. Tony is the writer of such comics as Bart Simpsons comics, The Simpsons, Super Frat, Tony DiGerolamo’s The Travelers and many others. You can catch Tony’s most current work on http://www.thewebcomicfactory.com/. The guys discuss Tony’s career, kids at conventions and toward the end they get a little political. It’s a bit of a left turn for us, but we still had fun with this one. We hope you enjoy.

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You can find   Tony DiGerolamo on the web here: http://www.thewebcomicfactory.com/

and follow him on twitter here: https://twitter.com/TonyDiGerolamo

And as always please leave feedback on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Superherospeak

 

 

Deconstructing Comics #359: Two Kinds of Monsters

What do you do when your town monster just doesn’t bring the scary? Hire someone to get the big red guy out of his funk. Rob Harrell breaks out of the funny pages with his first graphic novel, Monster on the Hill; Tim & Mulele review.

Meanwhile, much scarier monsters lurk in the background of Justin Randall’s Changing Ways, Book 2. Tim & Brandon take a look and compare with Book 1. The monsters are scary, but is the book?

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Deconstructing Comics #280: Comics for Kids! No, really!

While comics continue to register in the American consciousness as being inherently “for kids”, conversely, the “Wednesday stack” crowd wring their collective hands about an apparent lack of comics readers under the voting age. There are comics out there for kids, but where can you find them? And, is anyone reading them?

Tim investigates these questions and more, with three guests: Buddy Scalera, author of Comics from Start to Finish and now a writer on the new Richie Rich title; Rashad Doucet, creator of My Dog is a Superhero; and Brent Erwin, Co-Publisher and General Partner at APE Entertainment.

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The PKD Black Box-Episode #50: Jetta Meets Billy Ocean & John Cena.

Martheus and Janet Wade are interviewed about their latest Original Graphic Novel, Jetta: Tales of The Toshigawa – Full Circle, then Jon Carroll swings by as he and Shawn discuss the iPad 2 and Race In Comics, and later on Donny Salvo stops by as Shawn tells him about the strangest dream he’s ever had, which then lead to a slew of tangents to later finding out what John Cena and Donny have in common!

This episode has everything you could possibly need! Enjoy.

Deconstructing Comics #244: Calvin & Hobbes

Calvin and HobbesFrom 1985 to 1995, Bill Watterson’s Calvin and Hobbes challenged newspaper readers with imaginative stories, beautiful art, philosophical discussions, and ROTFL gags. Watterson famously eschewed commercialism, not only in the strip, but in real life, approving no C&H tie-in products other than books of strips and a calendar or two. Tim and Kumar discuss this game-changing strip and how relevant it remains today.

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Deconstructing Comics #165: Mo Willems’ Dirty Little Secret

PigeonFLASHBACK! Children’s book writer Mo Willems has been found out: he’s actually a comics creator! He talks to Tim about the state of American comics for kids, the effect of his animation background on his approach to creating books, and… just why does that pigeon want to drive a bus, anyway?! (Originally published Feb 2, 2009)

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Deconstructing Comics #225: Wizards of Oz… and “Toto” too!

L. Frank Baum’s classic children’s story The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was published 109 years ago and still inspires attempts to adapt it to other media. While the 1939 MGM movie tends to define the story in the minds of many, subsequent adaptations do stick closer to the original book than to the movie, including the two we discuss this week: a French version adapted by David Chauvel and Enrique Fernandez (published in English by Image), and Marvel’s recent version, adapted by Eric Shanower and Skottie Young.

Rashad Doucet, a published children’s book author in his own right, joins Tim in comparing the two adaptations, as well as discussing Yuko Osada‘s “Toto: The Wonderful Adventure” and, uh, “sexy Dorothys“.

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Too Old to Grow Up! – Episode 72 – Why We’re Screwed Up

Growing up in the 80’s, we watched some weird stuff.  But it all beats the stuff we’re feeding our kids today.  We take a look at some of the more disturbing movies “for kids” from the 1980s.