Comics Alternative, Episode 298: Our Sixth Annual Thanksgiving Show

Gathering Together for Comics

thanksgiving2016Thanksgiving is tomorrow, and Sterg and Derek gather around the ol’ podcasting dinner table to share some of the creators, publishers, locales, and and concepts they’re thankful for this year . Among the many things they mention are

  • the plentitude of comics today
  • Inio Asano’s new series, Dead Dead Deamon’s Dededede Destruction
  • Charles Forsman
  • VIZ Media’s new Perfect Editions of Naoki Urasawa’s 20th Century Boys
  • The Nib
  • New York Review Comics
  • comics-centric cons
  • TwoMorrows Press
  • Craig Yoe
  • publishers who use Kickstarter to get their seasonal works out
  • Heroes Aren’t Hard to Find, The Comics Experience, and other great local comic shops
  • the completion of Jason Lutes’s Berlin
  • review copies
  • creators who are kind and warm individuals
  • students who are researching the way people consume and interpret comics

So give thanks this year, and read some great comics!

ForbiddenWorldsThanksgiving

Comics Alternative Interviews: Jason Lutes

Time Codes:

  • 00:00:24 – Introduction
  • 00:02:26 – Setup of interview
  • 00:04:50 – Interview with Jason Lutes
  • 01:20:31 – Wrap up
  • 01:21:13 – Contact us

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Stones, Smoke, and Light

Jason Lutes began his Berlin series in the spring of 1996, with plans to publish his ambitious project over a 24-issue run. Over the years, he pared down the number of issues to 22, and the last of those was released in March of this year. Earlier this month, Drawn and Quarterly released a complete single-volume edition of Berlin, clocking in at over 550 pages, as well as a third volume of the series, City of Light, for those who had already gotten the previous two collections, City of Stones and City of Smoke, and didn’t want to get the completed series in just one volume.

Berlin is a massive narrative with an ensemble cast. It takes place in that volatile city during the last days of the Weimar Republic, 1928-1933, when Germany was struggling with its economy and war reparations, and a variety of political factions — in particular, the Communist Party and the National Socialist Workers Party — were vying for power. Lutes’s story primarily focuses on the lives of Kurt Severing, a world-weary journalist, and Marthe Müller, an uncertain art student moving to Berlin and longing to define herself in this newly adopted city. But there are a variety of other characters, as well, and Lutes even peppers his fictional cast with several historically based figures, including the jailed journalist Carl von Ossietzky, Joseph Goebbels, Josephine Baker, and, yes, Adolf Hitler himself. The result is an expansive narrative that not only captures the Weimar culture at the time, but also explores individual desires and unpredictable relationships in the midst of political and economic upheaval. In his interview with him, Derek talks with Jason about the origins of the series, the amount of research that went into the project, how the city of Berlin became a point of inspiration, the various challenges he faced maintaining such an ongoing series for over 20 years, and where Jason’s artistic ambitions may take him next.