Comics Alternative, Euro Comics: Reviews of Hasib and the Queen of Serpents: A Tale of a Thousand and One Nights and Moon Face

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Wild Tales

On the July episode of the Euro Comics series — actually being released in early August — Pascal and Derek discuss two beautiful texts. They begin with David B.’s Hasib and the Queen of Serpents: A Tale of a Thousand and One Nights (NBM Publishing), an incredible adaptation of one of the tales in the classic work. The guys point out the attention-gragging handling of Scheherazade “Queen of Serpents” story, but what stands out in this text is David B.’s illustrations, colors, and design. The creator is able both to translate the story into comics with much fidelity and to give the tale his own spin that is recognizable to any fan of David B.’s work (Epileptic is a case in point).

Next, Derek and Pascal jump into Alejandro Jodorowsky and Francois Boucq’s Moon Face (Humanoids). This isn’t the first time that this creative team has been discussed on the podcast, the first time being the December 2016 show with Bouncer (and, with Boucq, his work with Jerome Charyn). The guys spend a lot of time discussing the wild ride of Jodorowsky’s story — and this as a defining characteristic throughout much of his oeuvre. It is all over the place, yet compelling. But one of the things that marks Moon Face is Boucq’s art. While readers can appreciate Jodorowsky’s writing, it is Boucq who stands out, arguably as the biggest strength in this text.

Comics Alternative Kickstarter: The Secret Voice, Vol. 1

A Psychedelic Fantasy Epic

Derek talks with Zack Sot0 about his Kickstarter project The Secret Voice, Vol. 1. Zack describes it as “as psychedelic fantasy epic” filled with psychic warrior monks, wild kung fu magic battles, monsters, and even a bit of romance.

Over the coals of their conversation, Zack discusses the origins of The Secret Voice in a minicomic, its development as a webcomic and then a comic book, and its maturation as a book-length narrative. The creator describes the premise this way:

Doctor Galapagos, a goggled, bandaged mystery man is just one of many agents of the ineffable Red College that we meet in the pages of The Secret Voice. Doctor Galapagos is our hero, our mystic battle man on the spot. He seems wildly capable of facing any and all hand to hand combatants. But Dr. G isn’t just battling hundreds of angry trolls or brigands all at once, he’s also fighting an unseen, unknown, psychic menace. He’s finding his grip on reality becoming more and more tenuous, just when he needs it the most.

There are a variety of reward levels to choose from, as well, including not only the book — in both digital and hardcopy format — but swag, original art, and prints. This is a fun story that the Two Guys have discussed on a past episode of the webcomics series, so you know it’s worth checking out. So what are you waiting for? Back The Secret Voice, Vol. 1!

Cover and Sample Art

 

Comics Alternative Interviews: Mairghread Scott and Robin Robinson

Time Codes:

  • 00:00:25 – Introduction
  • 00:02:49 – Setup of interview
  • 00:03:58 – Interview with Mairghread Scott and Robin Robinson
  • 01:03:26 – Wrap up
  • 01:04:32 – Contact us

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If You’re Going to San Francisco

First Second has recently published The City on the Other Side, a historically based fantasy written by Mairghread Scott and with art by Robin Robinson. Gwen and Derek talk with the creators about their new book, the genesis behind the concept, and their decision to base their narrative in San Francisco. This is a compelling story that should have wide appeal, and not only with younger readers. Over the course of the conversation, Mairghread and Robin share their experiences researching various cultures’ folklore (upon which many of the figures are based), the importance of character design, their methods of collaboration, and the significance of maps.

Comics Alternative Interviews: Grace Ellis and Shae Beagle

Time Codes:

  • 00:26 – Introduction
  • 02:22 – Setup of interview
  • 03:46 – Interview with Grace Ellis and Shae Beagle
  • 43:14 – Wrap up
  • 43:49 – Contact us

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Magical Baristas

Mythical figures, anthropomorphic characters, and heavy dose of magic, all set in a contemporary urban landscape complete with coffeehouses, mobile devices, and garage bands. This is the world of Moonstruck, a series that began last year and coming out from Image Comics. The writer and artist of this series, Grace Ellis and Shae Beagle, were kind enough to come on The Comics Alternative to talk about the completion of the first narrative arc and what we might expect with the second. These two creators have known each other for a long time, and, along with their editor and designer, Laurenn McCubbin, have experienced a curious incubation period for their project. Derek talks with Grace and Shae about the origins of Moonstruck, their unique mix of fantasy and contemporary cultural concerns, the process of collaboration, and their attempts to build a reading community, not only with their storytelling, but also through social media and a keen understanding of their target audience.

Comics Alternative, Episode 272: Reviews of Babylon Berlin, The True Death of Billy the Kid, and The Highest House #1

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Mysteries

This week Gene and Derek discuss three recent titles, all of which concern mysteries. They begin with Babylon Berlin (Titan Comics), Arne Jysch’s comics adaptation of Volker Kutscher’s noir prose novel. It takes place in 1929 Berlin and set in the Weimar Republic, with all of its historical and cultural contexts embedded within. The guys are very impressed with Jysch and Kutscher’s narrative, and they spend a lot of time not only discussing the work as an example of crime noir, but also the issues involved in adapting a text from one medium to another (including the recent Netflix series).

Next, they look at Rick Geary’s latest efforts, The True Death of Billy The Kid (NBM Graphic Novels). This began as a Kickstarter campaign back in 2014, and in many ways it follows the format of Geary’s true crime comics. Indeed, both Derek and Gene are big fans of Geary’s art and his handling of the history and research surrounding infamous deeds. This is not a biography of Billy the Kid, but true to the book’s title, it focuses on the days that lead up to the death of this legendary figure.

Finally, the Two Guys turn their attention to The Highest House #1 (IDW Publishing). Released in conjunction with the French publisher Glénat Editions, this brings back together Mike Carey, Peter Gross, and Yuko Shimizu, the creative team that brought us The Unwritten. This story is more of an overt fantasy than the previous series. The inaugural issue sets a solid foundation for Carey’s world building, and as both Gene and Derek observe, the larger album format allows a full display of Gross’s marvelous art.

Comics Alternative, Webcomics: Reviews of Everblue, Handrava, and Warning Label

Time Codes:

  • 00:00:27 – Introduction
  • 00:02:56 – We get mail!
  • 00:08:08 – Everblue
  • 00:34:53 – Handrava
  • 01:07:31 – Warning Label
  • 01:33:36 – Wrap up
  • 01:35:17 – Contact us

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Relationships

For the month of March, Sean and Derek discuss three webcomics that are very different in terms of art style and storytelling technique. However, what all three have in common is a focus on relationships. They start off with Michael Sexton’s Everblue, a fantastical tale about two young adventurers who want to explore their world while at the same time avoiding the threats that are in pursuit. After that the guys discuss Handrava, a more realistic narrative set in Madagascar’s capital city. It’s author Rado R. captures the rhythms and flavors of his subject matter through both the dialogue and the visual layout of his scripting. Finally, Derek and Sean turn to a recently completed webcomic, Thom Zahler’s Warning Label. As with the creator’s previous works — most notably Love and Capes, Long Distance, and Time and Vine — the focus is on relationships and its unpredictable contours. This is yet another impressive work from Zahler, and one that will leave you, once again, with a warm and positive feeling.

Wayne’s Comics Podcast #301: Sebastian Girner

Wayne Hall, Wayne’s Comics, scales, scoundrels, dragon, Image Comics, Sebastian Girner, Galaad, Luvander, all-ages, fantasy,

This week in Episode 301, you’ll hear my great interview with comics editor/scripter Sebastian Girner as he talks about his new Image comic Scales and Scoundrels. You may remember Mr. Girner from his other successful comic, Shirtless Bear Fighter, which we also discuss briefly. However, the focus in on his new title with accomplished artist Galaad, so we get into how the series has come to be, who the characters are, and what we can expect from Sebastian in the future! It’s another great chat, so be sure not to miss it!

Arc Reactions – 81 – Jeff

We cover Jeff by Travis Bundy and Chad Thomas in our second episode of follow up fall. We talk about the story, the characters, and interview the writer/artist.

Talking points
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Story (1:44)
Characters (4:27)
Art (8:25)
Interview with Travis (9:44)

If you would like to download the episode, right click and Save As

As Mentioned
—————–

Arc Reactions – 35 – Billy Love Nibbles

Our next podcast will be our review of  The Defenders (Netflix) on September 17th.

We would like to thank Packie Wambaugh for recording our intro and outro music for us.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Contact us with any feedback or suggestions you may have and subscribe to us on your favorite platform:

Comics Alternative, Episode 239: Reviews of Herman by Trade, Rise of the Dungeon Master, and Eternal Empire #1

Listen to the podcast!

Time Codes:

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Huzzah!

This week Andy and Derek look at three new titles, each one visiting the fantastic in one form or another. Before they jump into the reviews, however, they discuss some of the big comics news from the past week: the announcement of the 2017 Eisner Award nominations and Free Comic Book Day. The guys don’t go into too much detail about the Eisner nominees because they plan on devoting an upcoming episode to that topic. However, they do briefly mention the curious situation surrounding the nomination of the Love Is Love collection in the Best Anthology category. They have much more to say about last Saturday’s Free Comic Book Day. Both guys share some of their experiences at their local shops and the free comics they got there. Listen to the podcast’s FCBD episode for more details.

But then the Two Guys get into the heart of this week’s show. They begin with Chris W. Kim’s Herman by Trade, coming out this week from SelfMadeHero. Although on the surface this appears to be a more realistic narrative, its fantastic elements become apparent in the transformation of the title character who has the ability to change his appearance and mimic others’ abilities at will. As both Derek and Andy point out, this is an unusual story that sticks with you long after reading.

Next, they turn to a new graphic biography that is all about fantasy, Rise of the Dungeon Master: Gary Gygax and the Creation of D&D (Nation Books). The art is by Koren Shadmi, but the book is written by David Kushner, based on a profile he wrote for Wired magazine in 2008. What’s most notable about this brief biography is the narrative point of view, almost entirely presented in the second person. This is fully in keeping with the spirit of role-playing games, where in this case the the narrating presence is, in essence, your “dungeon master” guiding your awareness as you enter the creators’ biographical realm.

Finally, Andy and Derek conclude with the latest collaboration from Jonathan Luna and Sarah Vaughn. Eternal Empire #1 (Image Comics) is a fantasy set in a distant world that, as Andy points out, is reminiscent of Game of Thrones. In fact, the guys spend a good bit of time speculating on the originality of this series, wondering if the unique elements will become more apparent in the issues to come. And while Andy isn’t sure if he’ll stick around to find out, Derek is going to give Eternal Empire a chance, especially given his appreciation of the Luna brothers’ previous comics, and especially Luna and Vaughn’s previous series Alex + Ada.

Comics Alternative, Webcomics: Reviews of Isle of Elsi, Late Bloomer, and Carriers

Listen to the podcast!

Time Codes:

  • 00:00:28 – Introduction
  • 00:03:03 – Eisner Award nominees announced
  • 00:10:04 – Isle of Elsi
  • 00:47:30 – Late Bloomer
  • 01:09:44 – Carriers
  • 01:31:32 – Wrap up
  • 01:32:31 – Contact us

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Very Punny

Sean and Derek are back with your monthly dose of webcomics analysis. Before they jump into their reviews, however, they spending a little time discussing the recent announcement of this year’s nominees for the Eisner Awards. The guys will devote next month’s episode to the actual webcomics nominated, so they don’t go into much detail this time, but they do mention the big news that the judges have tried to distinguish “webcomics” from “digital comics”…albeit rather ineptly. Tune in next month for more in-depth discussion on this matter!

But for May, Sean and Derek already have plenty to consider. They begin with Alec Longstreth’s Isle of Elsi, an all-age fantasy with a penchant for word play. Both of the guys are bowled away by this webcomic, one of the most impressive that they’ve discussed on the show. Not only are the art and storytelling top-notch, but the design of the website is a big draw, as well. (And while you’re at it, check out the Two Guys’ 2014 interview with Longstreth.)

Next, they turn to another webcomic from Webtoons, Late Bloomer. Written and drawn by Zealforart (AKA Tiffany Woodall), this is a shōjo-inspired romance about a young woman with a flower bud growing out of her belly, a family condition that can only be overcome with her being “deflowered.” Yes, it is quite an unusual premise.

Finally, Derek and Sean wrap up with Lauren R. Weinstein’s Carriers. This completed webcomic was originally published in five parts on the Nautilus website, and it received an Ignatz Award nomination in 2015 for the “Outstanding Online Comic” category. It’s a sobering look at being a carrier of cystic fibrosis and what means for young couples wanting to start a family.

Wayne’s Comics Podcast #273: Terrance Grace

Wayne Hall, Wayne’s Comics, Terrance Grace, Locksmith, Neo-Noir, mystery, fantasy, science fiction, Kickstarter, Silvio dB, Anderson Cabral, Detective Mick Fagan, Antiago, New York City, Lucero, Spanish Moss

If you’re looking for a great comic to support, I have an excellent suggestion – The Locksmith! This week, in Episode 273, I talk with creator Terrance Grace about the third issue of this engaging miniseries, and we discuss the Kickstarter supporting this project, which is now underway. We delve into how this comic came to be, how Terrance developed the characters and brought together the creative team working on The Locksmith, and what we might see from them in the future! I highly recommend you go to this link and support this Indie book! While his goal has already been met, he has some stretch goals that you will enjoy receiving, so don’t miss out on backing this superb comics project! To follow Terrance and keep up with what he’s working on, go to his website!

 

Airship 27 Podcast #23: Comanche Blood

Captain Ron Fortier and Chief Engineer Rob Davis return to the skies with a brand new episode of the Airship 27 Podcast!

This episode, they discuss their first release of 2017, Comanche Blood, updates on the Brother Bones movie (locations, casting and more!), their latest Sherlock Holmes volume on Radio Archives and more!

Plus, they spend a bulk of the episode answering listener questions before closing out the show!

Wayne’s Comics Podcast #243 With Eric Palicki

Wayne Hall, Wayne’s Comics, Kickstarter, Eric Palicki, Orphans, Red Angel Dragnet, Fake Empire, Guardians of the Galaxy, Marvel, Gamora, Kitty Pride, X-Men, sci-fi, horror, fantasy, tooth fairy,

This week in Episode 243, I had a great time talking with comics creator Eric Palicki, who created Orphans Volume One, Red Angel Dragnet Volume One and Fake Empire, all now available in graphic novel format. He then scripted a Gamora and Kitty Pride story in Guardians of Infinity #6 for Marvel, so he’s developed quite a lot of great storytelling in sci-fi, fantasy and horror as well as worked for the House of Ideas. We talk about his writing experiences, including how all these terrific books came to be, then he gives us information on his next project and how we can be sure to get our order in for it! Be sure to listen to what he has to say! For more information, check out Eric’s website at this link!

 

Deconstructing Comics #496: Oglaf: Sword, Sorcery, and Sex

Oglaf

If you like your comedy sexy (or your porn funny), you’re probably a fan of Oglaf, Doug Bayne and Trudy Cooper‘s long-running Web comic. This week, Tim calls up Doug and Trudy in Sydney to talk about the fantasy-parody elements of the strip, the missing main character Ivan, the diversity of sexual orientations in the strip, why they rarely table at conventions, and more.

Deconstructing Comics site

ComicsVerse Podcast Episode 66: Image’s MONSTRESS by Marjorie Liu

https://soundcloud.com/comicsverse/episode-66-marjorie-lius-monstress

MONSTRESS, written by Marjorie Liu and illustrated by Sana Takeda, is an all-new series from IMAGE comics. At the center of the story is Maika Halfwolf, a young arcanic (i.e. non-human) girl with a mysterious past and an even more mysterious power she can’t control. Tortured by the murder of her mother, Maika searches for both answers and revenge to her mother’s death with a single-minded focus. With only 3 issues out so far, the fantasy epic is focused primarily on world building and setting the stage for what promises to be an out-of-this-world plot full of deception, betrayal, discovery, witches, arcanists, spirits, magic, ghosts, and gods. Set during a fragile truce between the Arcanic and the Human Federation (The Motherland) and their Cumaea allies, MONSTRESS is a story about war and the effects of war on those most often forgotten – the victims. Along the way, however, MONSTRESS addresses timeless issues surrounding race, power negotiations, slavery, inequality, what it means to be human, the power of memory to shape both identity and the role the dead play in transforming ongoing life.

LISTEN: Did you know Marjorie Liu wrote for Marvel’s ASTONISHING X-MEN? Our podcast on Emma Frost is a great introduction to the X-Men world!

In this podcast, ComicsVerse contributors Kay Honda, Kristine Don, Mirae Lee, Emily Coleman, and Génesis Tuyuc examine how Liu and Takeda use fantasy as a means to explore oppression, subjugation, race and gender relations, and the idea of otherness in the war-ravaged world of MONSTRESS. How do Liu and Takeda use a matriarchal society to subvert genre standards? How do Liu and Takeda enrich the world of MONSTRESS, specifically with the use Asian mythology and landscapes?

We also consider Maika as a protagonist and what her relationships or lack thereof reveal about who she was, who she is, and who she isn’t. Is Maika a hero in the strictest sense or is she morally ambiguous? What is the significance of her handicap? What is the importance of the highly feared and desired ‘mask’ which Maika carries within her? Who are these Leviathans and why is Maika the only one who can see them? How can we analyze each character using Batson’s Truth Characterization and what does this reveal about their truth, their flaw, and their conflict?

CLICK: Want to read more MONSTRESS? We analyzed the first issue rather extensively in this review!

This podcast delves into the power storytelling has to reveal uncomfortable truths about the monster in all of us. From all of us here at ComicsVerse, we hope you enjoy this podcast and join us in our discussion of the fantasy epic MONSTRESS in the comments below!

For your convenience, this podcast is also available on iTunes!

Download The ComicsVerse Podcast on iTunessource: http://comicsverse.com/episode-66-monstress/

homepage: http://comicsverse.com