Comics Alternative Interviews: Another Conversation with Luke Healy

Time Codes:

  • 00:00:24 – Introduction
  • 00:02:25 – Setup of interview
  • 00:04:11 – Interview with Luke Healy
  • 01:04:50 – Wrap up
  • 01:05:30 – Contact us

blkfade

Ego Boost

Luke Healy was first on The Comics Alternative at Small Press Expo in 2016, where he briefly spoke with Derek about his provocative self-published minicomic The Unofficial Cuckoo’s Nest Study Companion, which was nominated that year for an Ignatz Award. A couple of months later Luke came back on the show, this time for a long and more in-depth interview about his new book at the time, How to Survive in the North, released from Nobrow Press. And now, Luke comes back on podcast to discuss his most recent work. His brand-new book revisits some of his older writings and places them within an entirely new context. Permanent Press has just been released from Avery Hill Publishing, and it’s a mock autobiographical text that explores the world of independent comics creators and the relationship between a cartoonist and his ego. What’s more, the new book incorporates the previously self-published The Unofficial Cuckoo’s Nest Study Companion, but it does so in a way that brings a fresh perspective to the story and even underscores its experimental nature. In this interview, Derek talks with Luke Healy about the origins of Permanent Press, its highly satirical tone, and the process of looking inside of himself and pulling out a narrative that is not entirely autobiographical, but at the same time, not purely fiction. As you’ll hear, Luke is certainly one of the medium’s most meditative creators.

Comics Alternative, Episode 227: Reviews of Untitled Ape’s Epic Adventure, Blood Blister #1, and The Belfry

Listen to the podcast!

Bark-Free

Time Codes:

blkfade

This week the Two Guys with PhDs discuss three very different titles. They begin with Steven Tillotson’s Untitled Ape’s Epic Adventure (Avery Hill Publishing), a different kind of quest narrative that blends the anthropomorphic and the surreal. After that, they look at Phil Hester and Tony Harris’s Blood Blister #1, the latest serial offering from AfterShock Comics. And finally, Andy and Derek wrap up with The Belfry (Image Comics), a one-shot horror title from Gabriel Hardman.

blkfade

Comics Alternative, Episode 188: A Publisher Spotlight on Avery Hill Publishing

Listen to the podcast!

Musical Discoveries

AveryHill-banner

Gwen and Derek are back with another publisher spotlight episode, this one on the UK press, Avery Hill Publishing. They begin their spotlight with a short interview with the people behind Avery Hill: Ricky Miller, Dave White, and Katriona Chapman. Derek talks with them about the origins of the press, the kind of creators that have come to define Avery Hill, their distribution and publicity outside of the UK, and their plans for fall releases and beyond.

After that conversation, Gwen and Derek get into the nitty gritty of the publisher’s current offerings. They start by looking at the most recent issues of two ongoing series from Avery Hill, Reads #4 and Metroland #3. The former is an anthology periodical currently in its second volume, and the two discuss its various serialized storylines. Gwen is particularly fond of Owen D. Pomery’s “The Megatherium Club,” but they also discuss Reads‘ other historically based stories — Ricky Avery-HillMiller and Tim Bird’s “Hitchcock and Film” as well as Bird and Luke James Halsall’s “The Bullpen” (inspired by Marvel Comics in the early 1960s) — and the colorful, offbeat comics of EdieOP. The most recent issue of Metroland continues the drama behind Ricky Miller and Julia Scheele’s fictional 1980s band, Electric Dreams, and while discussing this evolving narrative, Derek and Gwen even wax nostalgic over their own musical histories growing up during that time.

Next, they discuss three new books released this spring. A City Inside is yet another work from Tillie Walden — she’s become a singular force at Avery Hill — and this one is a measured, meditative look at self-identity with an almost poetic tone. Rachael Smith’s Artificial Flowers does to the London art scene what Miller and Scheele’s Metroland does with the city post-punk. Both the artist’s unassuming premise and her clean, iconic art style easily draw Gwen and Derek into this fun story. And then finally, the cohosts wrap up with the latest book in Matthew Swan’s Parsley Girl series. Neither Derek nor Gwen had been familiar with Swan’s work previously, but Parsley Girl: Carrots proves to be a good introduction into his weird and almost psychedelic narrative world.

Overall, both Gwen and Derek find a lot of excitement behind this young press. Avery Hill may be just now getting a foothold in the US market — thanks to its recent distribution agreement with Retrofit/Big Planet — but as this episode demonstrates, it’s definitely a publisher worth watching.

Parsley Girl-interior

blkfade

Comics Alternative Interviews: Tillie Walden

Listen to the podcast!

“Great party, isn’t it?”

WaldenPicOn this episode of The Comics Alternative Interviews, Derek has a great time talking with Tillie Walden, the author of a brand new book from Avery Hill Publishing, The End of Summer. This is her debut graphic novel, and, in fact, her conversation with Derek is the very first time she’s been on a podcast. (Yet another Comics Alternative exclusive!) On the show, Tillie talks about the origins of her story, her process of creation, and the unlikely events that led to her first publication. The End of Summer is a narrative of purpose in isolation, EndOfSummeran attempt to find meaning in a life defined by diminishing options. Walden’s haunting art reveals the inner turmoil of her protagonist/narrator, Lars, as he negotiates the tangles within his family over the course of one long winter. Plus, she includes in her story a giant cat by the name of Nemo. Derek talks with Tillie about the balancing act of being a full-time student — she’s just wrapped up her first year at the Center for Cartoon Studies — and creating a long-form comic. They also discuss her love of architectural illustration (evident throughout the book), the dream-like quality of her storytelling, and the many instances of Kubrick’s The Shining that kept popping into Derek’s head as he was reading the book. All in all, it is an illuminating conversation that will have you wanting to check out this promising young writer.

Here is some sample art from The End of Summer:

EndofSummer2

And be sure to check out Tillie Walden’s website.

blkfade