Critiquing Comics #114: “Spencer and Locke”

Spence and Locke

A noir thriller… that seems very reminiscent of a very different comic strip! Tim and Mulele discuss “Spencer and Locke” by David Pepose and Jorge Santiago Jr.!

Also, we talk about Marvel and the backlash toward “Secret Empire”.

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Deconstructing Comics #552: “Logan”

Logan

This week, in our first Marvel-related movie review since Iron Man 2(!), Kumar and Dana discuss Logan. Is it an action movie? The action scenes are limited, but when they occur, there are no limits.

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Deconstructing Comics #551: R. Sikoryak


Robert Sikoryak is known for adopting the styles of various famous comics and mashing them up with classic literature, Donald Trump quotes, and even the iTunes user agreement. This week he talks with Koom how he chooses the specific pairings of comics titles and other content, why he didn’t want to do his book on Trump, what Kafka’s Metamorphosis and Schulz’s Peanuts have in common, getting inside the head of the creator whose work he’s parodying, and more.

 

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Critiquing Comics #113: “Kid Sherlock”

Kid Sherlock

It’s Sherlock Holmes as a kid, with a talking dog for Watson! Tim and Mulele discuss Justin Phillips, Sean Gregory Miller, and Lesley Atlansky’s Kid Sherlock!

PLUS: Don’t miss Mulele’s story of the wild day-job situation that’s been keeping him from getting his comics done — but will now facilitate it!

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Deconstructing Comics #550: Four TCAF Interviews

This year’s Toronto Comic Arts Festival was held May 13 & 14. Koom was there and brought back interviews with Dave McKean, Jessica Campbell, Rick Geary, and Charlie Adlard!

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Deconstructing Comics #549: Kind of Epic Episode

Vision

This week, Gabrial and David from the Kind of Epic Show podcast join Tim to talk about their show, and various Marvel Comics highlights (and lowlights) from the past 30 years — and in particular, Tom King and Gabriel Hernandez Walta’s The Vision.

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Critiquing Comics #112: “Squarriors”

Squarriors

Humanity has died out, and other animals — notably, squirrels — have become more intelligent, banding into factions and battling each other with primitive weapons. Why did this happen? And, now what? Tim and Mulele discuss Ashley Witter and Ash Maczko’s Squarriors.

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Deconstructing Comics #548: Jaime Hernandez

Jaime Hernandez

Love and Rockets continues to impress, and in this episode Koom asks creator Jaime Hernandez some burning questions. Hernandez talks about writing Maggie and Hopey, the dynamics of working on something with your brother, why he gravitates toward female characters, his influences and art style, and more.

Also, Tim and Mulele discuss the current state of the US comics market and Marvel’s recent problems.

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Deconstructing Comics #547: “The Ten-Cent Plague”

The Ten-Cent Plague

The Comics Code, while not much more than a memory today, had a huge effect on the direction of American comics for half a decade. David Hajdu’s book The Ten-Cent Plague looks at the events that led up to the code, following the development of comics — and the protests against them — through the first half of the twentieth century. Why were comics scapegoated for social ills? Tim and Paul discuss the book.

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Critiquing Comics #111: “Evil Witch Allie”

Evil Witch Allie

Jake lives near a bog along a lake, and the bog makes him uncomfortable. On Halloween night, he finds a little girl in a witch costume stuck in the bog and he rescues her. Is she really a witch? What’s going on a Jake’s neighbors’ house? Tim and Mulele are reading Evil Witch Allie, by Kristin Tipping, to find out!

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Deconstructing Comics #546: “The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye”

Charlie Chan Hock Chye


Why read a biography of a fictional comics artist? What if it’s also a history of Singapore — done in a style that apes more than a dozen seminal 20th century comics creators? Tim and Kumar take a look at the awe-inspiring (yet sometimes puzzling) Sonny Liew graphic novel The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye.

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Deconstructing Comics #545: Peter Bagge

FIRE!!

Peter Bagge is known for the manic comic series “Hate”. But his recent work has gone a different direction: profiling women who made a difference in early 20th century America. Why the change in topic and tone? In this interview, recorded with Koom in a spotlight discussion at Toronto Comicon, Bagge discusses what drew him to making comics bios of Margaret Sanger (Woman Rebel) and Zora Neale Hurston (Fire!!).

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Critiquing Comics #110: “The Non-Seen” chapter two

The Non-Seen Ch 2

A couple years back we critiqued the first chapter of a Web comic called The Non-Seen, by John Allie. It’s a slightly creepy story about a mysterious book, and the protagonists are kids. Now chapter two is completed, and we’ve been invited to take a look at it. Is the promise of chapter one paying off? Has he changed anything that we found lacking the first time?

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Deconstructing Comics #544: Gerhard

Dino's Cafe

At last month’s Toronto Comicon, Koom got a chance to sit down with Gerhard, most famous for drawing backgrounds and environments for (and NOT inking!) Dave Sim’s Cerebus. Koom talks with him about working with Dave Sim and navigating some of Sim’s more controversial moments; the ergonomics of comics creation; working with Grant Morrison on “Smile of the Absent Cat” in Heavy Metal; and more.

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Deconstructing Comics #543: Jeff Smith

Bone cousins

Jeff Smith wanted to do a newspaper comic strip, but he couldn’t sell his idea, so he ended up self-publishing it. Bone eventually caught on, and now it has a color edition from GRAPHIX and it might become a movie!

Jeff Smith joins Tim in this episode to talk about how he got started with self-publishing, why he decided to have Grandma Ben raise cows, why Bone became less funny in the later volumes, and more; plus, answers to some lingering questions from our review of his book RASL!

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